Nolalit

The Creativity Collective launches Nolalit, a book club that reads riveting works about New Orleans.

Nolalit votes on the books and reads independently, meeting the second Monday of the month at historic landmark, The Columns Hotel (3811 St Charles Ave, New Orleans, LA 70115) at 6:00 p.m. Adults and mature teens are invited to attend with $1 per meeting towards promotion. Food and drinks are available during Column’s happy hour 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Due to COVID-19, this month's Nolalit meeting will be held at the back yard of fellow member, Elizzabeth's, house. We will maintain social distance guidelines and everyone is required to wear a mask. To be a part of this or other monthly meetings, join our events through our Facebook page

Embrace local literature in a social setting! We celebrate completing a book with an optional field trip or author-speaker. This is a great introduction to the rich culture of New Orleans for new residents and anyone who wants to share their passion for reading about New Orleans with others.

Come laugh, be inspired, and participate in thought-provoking conversation. www.facebook.com/gonolalit.

Nolalit is a project of the Creativity Collective, a workforce of creative thinkers with a community focus–a 501c3 awarded non-profit that consists of artists, parents, and students.

Here are a few of the titles we have read:

  1. One Dead in Attic by Chris Rose

  2. Creole Trombone: Kid Ory and the Early Years of Jazz by John McCusker

  3. Hope and New Orleans by Sally Asher

  4. The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld by Christine Wiltz

  5. Off Magazine Street by Ronald Everett Capps

  6. A Streetcar Named Desire (play) by Tennessee Williams

  7. Intimate Enemies: The Two Worlds of Baroness de Pontalba by Christina Vella

  8. There's One In Your Neighborhood: The Lost Movie Theaters of New Orleans by Rene Brunet and Jack Stewart

  9. Bourbon Street: A History by Richard Campanella

  10. 1 Dead in Attic: Post-Katrina Stories by Chris Rose

  11. Interview With The Vampire (The Vampire Chronicles, #1) by Anne Rice

  12. Dead Man Walking: The Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty That Sparked a National Debate by Helen Prejean

  13. Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins

  14. Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans by Louis Armstrong

  15. The Fish That Ate the Whale: The Life and Times of America's Banana King by Rich Cohen

What We Are Reading Now

June 13th, 2020 Meeting:

The Lampshade by Mark Jacobson

Few growing up in the aftermath of World War II will ever forget the horrifying reports that Nazi concentration camp doctors had removed the skin of prisoners to makes common, everyday lampshades. In The Lampshade, bestselling journalist Mark Jacobson tells the story of how he came into possession of one of these awful objects, and of his search to establish the origin, and larger meaning, of what can only be described as an icon of terror.

Jacobson’s mind-bending historical, moral, and philosophical journey into the recent past and his own soul begins in Hurricane Katrina–ravaged New Orleans. It is only months after the storm, with America’s most romantic city still in tatters, when Skip Henderson, an old friend of Jacobson’s, purchases an item at a rummage sale: a very strange looking and oddly textured lampshade. When he asks what it’s made of, the seller, a man covered with jailhouse tattoos, replies, “That’s made from the skin of Jews.” The price: $35. A few days later, Henderson sends the lampshade to Jacobson, saying, “You’re the journalist, you find out what it is.” The lampshade couldn’t possibly be real, could it? But it is. DNA analysis proves it.

This revelation sends Jacobson halfway around the world, to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem and to the Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany, where the lampshades were supposedly made on the order of the infamous “Bitch of Buchenwald,” Ilse Koch. From the time he grew up in Queens, New York, in the 1950s, Jacobson has heard stories about the human skin lampshade and knew it to be the ultimate symbol of Nazi cruelty. Now he has one of these things in his house with a DNA report to prove it, and almost everything he finds out about it is contradictory, mysterious, shot through with legend and specious information.

Through interviews with forensic experts, famous Holocaust scholars (and deniers), Buchenwald survivors and liberators, and New Orleans thieves and cops, Jacobson gradually comes to see the lampshade as a ghostly illuminator of his own existential status as a Jew, and to understand exactly what that means in the context of human responsibility.

One question looms as his search goes on: what to do with the lampshade—this unsettling thing that used to be someone? It is a difficult dilemma to be sure, but far from the last one, since once a lampshade of human skin enters your life, it is very, very hard to forget.

The Lampshade 2020.jpg

CONTACT 

ADDRESS

PO Box 850956

New Orleans, LA 70118

HOURS OF OPPORATION

Mon - Fri :

10:00 - 19:00

CONTACT US

706-717-0434

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